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Tag Archives: Victorian novels

Post 12 – A book you wanted to read for a long time but still haven’t

Goodness, this is a tough one as my TBR pile is, let us say, extensive. And that list’s made up solely of books I could think of off the top of my head. Every book I read seems to serve as a letter of introduction to at least a dozen more and—oh, you know how it goes!

At this precise moment in time, the book I’ve wanted to read for a long time but still haven’t is the remainder of the Barchester Chronicles by Anthony Trollope. I powered through the first three after watching the BBC adaptation (with Alan Rickman playing the odious Rvd. Obadiah Slope) but never got around to finishing the series for some reason. :/

Alan Rickman as Rvd. Obadiah Slope. Is it wrong to fancy his eyebrows just a little bit?

So why do I want to read the rest of the series? Well, Trollope wrote rather satirically about the abuses of power within Cathedral and Hospital Trusts in the fictional cathedral city of Barchester (which he purportedly based on Salisbury). A dry subject, you may think, but when approached with Trollope’s wit and brilliant characters the subject becomes as intensely exciting as… well… as an Anthony Trollope novel can make it, which is to say; very exciting indeed!

In addition to the afore-mentioned ecclesiastical power struggles, there are also love stories that tug the heart strings, various financial problems and class struggles. It’s all so quintessentially English as the majority of the ‘drama’ does not unfold through peoples’ words but instead through the softly said understatements and the unspoken.

Darn, I want to finish that series now. :/

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Post 11 – Favourite classic book

As ever, thanks to Blogs of a Bookaholic for creating this challenge.

OK, first things first; I cannot do this question the same level of justice as the creator of this challenge. Click that. I’ve even included the link a 2nd time, just in case you don’t fancy scrolling up a few millimetres to click the 1st link.

Read it. Fall in love with Wuthering Heights either for the first time or all over again.

And now, for my favourite classic. As I mentioned before, I have two favourite classics, one book of poetry, In Memoriam A.H.H. by Tennyson and one novel. As I’ve already blogged about the former, this post is going to be about the latter. So, without further ado, allow me to present the book that I fall in love with again every time I read it: North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell.

So what makes this classic so awesome-sauce? I think it’s because (and forgive the analogy) at the end of the day, I like my books like I like my men– no naughty jokes please!- not just interesting and entertaining but also with some substance; something that will make me aware of the world around me and appreciate my own situation.

It is here that Gaskell really delivers the goods: she was an author whose writing addressed burning contemporary social issues and problems that appeared because of industrialisation. As the wife of a minister in Manchester, Gaskell would have been able to move amongst different social echelons and would undoubtedly have seen and heard the arguments and concerns of both the masters and hands about whom she wrote.

Many of the problems she mentions have yet to be solved, despite the hope expressed that ‘young industry’. If anything, I worry that in some instances, the situation has actually got worse. One example of this is the lack of power of many unions in the UK nowadays. Whereas the Union in North and South is a formidable opponent with the power to cause strikes that seriously affected industry but also won support for their cause (living wages that kept in line with inflation), when unions occasionally attempt the same action for exactly the same reason in this day and age, they are frequently mocked and denigrated, especially by the younger generation.

What I’m trying to say is what Gaskell wrote 159 years ago: ‘the union is a great power: it’s our only power’ and this power seems to be diminishing as people forget that, “It’s the only way working men can get their rights, by all joining together. More the members, more chance for each one separate man having justice done him.”

Well I got carried away there…

The icing on the cake is the romance between Mr Thornton and Margaret Hale. It’s approached so beautifully that some sections gave me goose-bumps and the sexual tension at some points made me go a little fluttery.

They start off as two good in people in their own rights, even though they have different outlooks on life, different experiences and somewhat different values and become- it is implied- the sort of couple that will bring out the best in each other.

 

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